Digitale Ausgabe

Download
TEI-XML (Ansicht)
Text (Ansicht)
Text normalisiert (Ansicht)
Ansicht
Textgröße
Originalzeilenfall ein/aus
Zeichen original/normiert
Zitierempfehlung

Alexander von Humboldt: „Milk, bread and butter trees.“, in: ders., Sämtliche Schriften digital, herausgegeben von Oliver Lubrich und Thomas Nehrlich, Universität Bern 2021. URL: <https://humboldt.unibe.ch/text/1818-Sur_le_Lait-73-neu> [abgerufen am 22.06.2024].

URL und Versionierung
Permalink:
https://humboldt.unibe.ch/text/1818-Sur_le_Lait-73-neu
Die Versionsgeschichte zu diesem Text finden Sie auf github.
Titel Milk, bread and butter trees.
Jahr 1856
Ort Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Nachweis
in: Friends’ review. A religious, literary and miscellaneous journal 9:18 (12. Januar 1856), S. 286–287.
Sprache Englisch
Typografischer Befund Antiqua; Spaltensatz; Auszeichnung: Kursivierung.
Identifikation
Textnummer Druckausgabe: III.56
Dateiname: 1818-Sur_le_Lait-73-neu
Statistiken
Seitenanzahl: 2
Spaltenanzahl: 3
Zeichenanzahl: 4063

Weitere Fassungen
Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général (Paris, 1818, Französisch)
On the Milk extracted from the Cow Tree (l’ Arbre de la Vache), and on Vegetable Milk in general (London, 1818, Englisch)
Der Kuhbaum und die Pflanzenmilch (Stuttgart; Tübingen, 1818, Deutsch)
Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache (Paris, 1818, Französisch)
On the Milk of the Cow Tree, and on Vegetable Milk in general (Sherborne, 1818, Englisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (London, 1818, Englisch)
Cow Tree (Edinburgh, 1818, Englisch)
On the Milk of the Cow-Tree, and on Vegetable Milk in general (London, 1818, Englisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (Edinburgh, 1818, Englisch)
Drzewo krowie i mléko roślinne (Lwiw, 1818, Polnisch)
Cow tree (Boston, Massachusetts, 1818, Englisch)
Cow tree (Baltimore, Maryland, 1818, Englisch)
Cow-tree (London, 1818, Englisch)
On the Milk of the Cow Tree, and on vegetable Milk in General (London, 1818, Englisch)
Notions sur le Lait de l’Arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général (Montpellier, 1818, Französisch)
Sul latte dell’ albero della Vacca e in generale sul latte dei vegetabili (Pavia, 1818, Italienisch)
Ueber die Milch des Kuhbaums und die Milch der Pflanzen überhaupt (Jena, 1818, Deutsch)
Cow-tree (New York City, New York, 1819, Englisch)
The milk tree (New York City, New York, 1819, Englisch)
Cow-tree (Natchez, Mississippi, 1819, Englisch)
On the Cow Tree of the Caraccas, and on the Milk of Vegetables in general (London, 1819, Englisch)
The cow-tree (London, 1819, Englisch)
The Cow-tree (London, 1819, Englisch)
The cow-tree (Kendal, 1819, Englisch)
Cow-tree (London, 1819, Englisch)
Cow tree (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1819, Englisch)
The cow-tree (London, 1819, Englisch)
The Cow Tree (Providence, Rhode Island, 1819, Englisch)
The cow tree (Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 1819, Englisch)
The cow tree (New York City, New York, 1819, Englisch)
The cow tree (Hallowell, Maine, 1819, Englisch)
The cow tree (Alexandria, Virginia, 1819, Englisch)
The cow tree (Albany, New York, 1819, Englisch)
The cow tree (New York City, New York, 1819, Englisch)
De koe-boom en de planten-melk. (Uit het Hoogduitsch)’ (Amsterdam, 1819, Niederländisch)
Ueber die Milch des Kuhbaums und die Pflanzenmilch überhaupt (Nürnberg, 1819, Deutsch)
The Cow-Tree (London, 1820, Englisch)
Milk Tree in South America (London, 1821, Englisch)
The cow tree (Trenton, New Jersey, 1824, Englisch)
The cow tree (York, 1825, Englisch)
The Cow Tree (London, 1826, Englisch)
Arbol de leche (London, 1827, Spanisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (Buffalo, New York, 1827, Englisch)
Description of the milk tree in South America (London, 1829, Englisch)
Vegetable substances – the cow tree (New York City, New York, 1832, Englisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (Wien, 1833, Deutsch)
Der Milchbaum (Wien, 1833, Deutsch)
Der Kuhbaum (Wien, 1834, Deutsch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (London, 1834, Englisch)
The cow-tree of South America (London, 1834, Englisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (Castlebar, 1834, Englisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (Durham, 1834, Englisch)
The cow-tree of South America (London, 1834, Englisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (Manchester, 1834, Englisch)
The Cow-Tree (London, 1834, Englisch)
Cow tree (Boston, Massachusetts, 1834, Englisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (New York City, New York, 1834, Englisch)
The Cow-Tree of South America (Merthyr Tydfil, 1835, Englisch)
Der Kuh- oder Milchbaum (München, 1838, Deutsch)
The cow tree (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1840, Englisch)
The Palo de Vacca (Belfast, 1841, Englisch)
The Cow Tree (Bolton, 1850, Englisch)
Arbol de leche (Mexico, 1852, Spanisch)
Milk, Bread, and Butter Trees! (Northampton, 1852, Englisch)
Milk, bread, and butter trees (Wells, 1852, Englisch)
Milk, bread, and butter trees (Cirencester, 1852, Englisch)
Milk, bread, and butter trees (Sligo, 1852, Englisch)
The Cow Tree (London, 1852, Englisch)
The palo de vaca or cow-tree (Enniskillen, 1853, Englisch)
The Cow Tree (Haverfordwest, 1853, Englisch)
The Cow Tree (Greensburg, Indiana, 1853, Englisch)
The cow tree (Loudon, Tennessee, 1854, Englisch)
Milk, bread and butter trees. (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1856, Englisch)
Milk and butter trees (London, 1856, Englisch)
The Cow Tree (Salisbury, North Carolina, 1857, Englisch)
|286| |Spaltenumbruch|

MILK, BREAD AND BUTTER TREES.

We had heard several weeks before of a tree,the sap of which is a nourishing milk. It iscalled “the cow tree,” and we were assuredthat the negroes of the farm, who drink plenti-fully of this vegetable milk, consider it a whole-some aliment. All the milky juices of plantsbeing acrid, bitter, and more or less poisonous,this account seemed to us very extraordinary;but we found, by experience, during our stayat Barbula, that the virtues of this tree had notbeen exaggerated. This fine tree rises like thebroad-leaved star-apple. Its oblong and pointedleaves, rough and alternate, are marked by late-ral ribs, prominent at the lower surface andparallel. Some of them are ten inches long.We did not see the flower; the fruit is some- |Spaltenumbruch|what fleshy, and contains one and sometimestwo nuts. When incisions are made in thetrunk of this tree, it yields an abundance of aglutinous milk, tolerably thick, devoid of allacridity, and of an agreeable and balmy smell.It was offered to us in the shell of a calabash.We drank considerable quantities of it in theevening before we went to bed, and very earlyin the morning, without feeling the least inju-rious effect. The viscosity of this milk alonerenders it a little disagreeable. The negroesand the free people who work in the plantationsdrink it, dipping into it their bread of maize orcassava. The overseer of the farm told us thatthe negroes grow sensibly fatter during theseason when the palo de vaca furnishes themwith most milk. This juice, exposed to the air,presents at its surface (perhaps in consequenceof the absorption of the atmospheric oxygen)membranes of a strongly animalized substance,yellow, somewhat resembling cheese. Thesemembranes, separated from the rest of themore aqueous liquid, are elastic, almost likecaoutchouc; but they undergo the same phe-nomena of putrefaction as gelatine. The peoplecall the coagulum, that separates by the contactof the air, cheese. The coagulum grows sourin the space of five or six days. Amidst thegreat number of curious phenomena which Ihave observed in the course of my travels, Iconfess there are few that have made so power-ful an impression on me as the aspect of thecow tree. Whatever relates to milk or to corninspires an interest which is not merely that ofthe physical knowledge of things, but is con-nected with another order of ideas and senti-ments. We can scarcely conceive how the humanrace could exist without farinaceous substances,and without that nourishing juice which thebreast of the mother contains, and which is ap-propriated to the long feebleness of the infant.The amylaceous matter of corn, the object ofreligious veneration among so many nations,ancient and modern, is diffused in the seeds,and deposited in the roots of vegetables; milkwhich serves as an aliment, appears to us ex-clusively the produce of animal organization.Such are the impressions we have received inour earliest infancy; such is also the source ofthat astonishment created by the aspect of thetree just described. It is not here the solemnshades of forests, the majestic course of rivers,the mountains wrapped in eternal snow, thatexcite our emotion. A few drops of vegetablejuice recal to our minds all the powerfulnessand the fecundity of nature. On the barrenflank of a rock grows a tree with coriaceous anddry leaves. Its large woody roots can scarcelypenetrate into the stone. For several monthsof the year, not a single shower moistens itsfoliage. Its branches appear dead and dried;but when the trunk is pierced, there flows fromit a sweet and nourishing milk. It is at the |287| |Spaltenumbruch|rising of the sun that this vegetable fountain ismost abundant; the negroes and natives arethen seen hastening from all quarters, furnishedwith large bowls to receive the milk, whichgrows yellow, and thickens at its surface. Someempty their bowls under the tree itself, otherscarry the juice home to their children.—Hum-boldt’s Travels in the Equinoctial Regions ofAmerica.