Digitale Ausgabe

Download
TEI-XML (Ansicht)
Text (Ansicht)
Text normalisiert (Ansicht)
Ansicht
Textgröße
Originalzeilenfall ein/aus
Zeichen original/normiert
Zitierempfehlung

Alexander von Humboldt: „The cow-tree“, in: ders., Sämtliche Schriften digital, herausgegeben von Oliver Lubrich und Thomas Nehrlich, Universität Bern 2021. URL: <https://humboldt.unibe.ch/text/1818-Sur_le_Lait-27-neu> [abgerufen am 11.12.2023].

URL und Versionierung
Permalink:
https://humboldt.unibe.ch/text/1818-Sur_le_Lait-27-neu
Die Versionsgeschichte zu diesem Text finden Sie auf github.
Titel The cow-tree
Jahr 1819
Ort London
Nachweis
in: Morning Advertiser 8737 (6. Oktober 1819), [o. S.].
Sprache Englisch
Typografischer Befund Antiqua; Spaltensatz.
Identifikation
Textnummer Druckausgabe: III.56
Dateiname: 1818-Sur_le_Lait-27-neu
Statistiken
Seitenanzahl: 1
Zeichenanzahl: 2744

Weitere Fassungen
Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général (Paris, 1818, Französisch)
On the Milk extracted from the Cow Tree (l’ Arbre de la Vache), and on Vegetable Milk in general (London, 1818, Englisch)
Der Kuhbaum und die Pflanzenmilch (Stuttgart; Tübingen, 1818, Deutsch)
Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache (Paris, 1818, Französisch)
On the Milk of the Cow Tree, and on Vegetable Milk in general (Sherborne, 1818, Englisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (London, 1818, Englisch)
Cow Tree (Edinburgh, 1818, Englisch)
On the Milk of the Cow-Tree, and on Vegetable Milk in general (London, 1818, Englisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (Edinburgh, 1818, Englisch)
Drzewo krowie i mléko roślinne (Lwiw, 1818, Polnisch)
Cow tree (Boston, Massachusetts, 1818, Englisch)
Cow tree (Baltimore, Maryland, 1818, Englisch)
Cow-tree (London, 1818, Englisch)
On the Milk of the Cow Tree, and on vegetable Milk in General (London, 1818, Englisch)
Notions sur le Lait de l’Arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général (Montpellier, 1818, Französisch)
Sul latte dell’ albero della Vacca e in generale sul latte dei vegetabili (Pavia, 1818, Italienisch)
Ueber die Milch des Kuhbaums und die Milch der Pflanzen überhaupt (Jena, 1818, Deutsch)
Cow-tree (New York City, New York, 1819, Englisch)
The milk tree (New York City, New York, 1819, Englisch)
Cow-tree (Natchez, Mississippi, 1819, Englisch)
On the Cow Tree of the Caraccas, and on the Milk of Vegetables in general (London, 1819, Englisch)
The cow-tree (London, 1819, Englisch)
The Cow-tree (London, 1819, Englisch)
The cow-tree (Kendal, 1819, Englisch)
Cow-tree (London, 1819, Englisch)
Cow tree (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1819, Englisch)
The cow-tree (London, 1819, Englisch)
The Cow Tree (Providence, Rhode Island, 1819, Englisch)
The cow tree (Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 1819, Englisch)
The cow tree (New York City, New York, 1819, Englisch)
The cow tree (Hallowell, Maine, 1819, Englisch)
The cow tree (Alexandria, Virginia, 1819, Englisch)
The cow tree (Albany, New York, 1819, Englisch)
The cow tree (New York City, New York, 1819, Englisch)
De koe-boom en de planten-melk. (Uit het Hoogduitsch)’ (Amsterdam, 1819, Niederländisch)
Ueber die Milch des Kuhbaums und die Pflanzenmilch überhaupt (Nürnberg, 1819, Deutsch)
The Cow-Tree (London, 1820, Englisch)
Milk Tree in South America (London, 1821, Englisch)
The cow tree (Trenton, New Jersey, 1824, Englisch)
The cow tree (York, 1825, Englisch)
The Cow Tree (London, 1826, Englisch)
Arbol de leche (London, 1827, Spanisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (Buffalo, New York, 1827, Englisch)
Description of the milk tree in South America (London, 1829, Englisch)
Vegetable substances – the cow tree (New York City, New York, 1832, Englisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (Wien, 1833, Deutsch)
Der Milchbaum (Wien, 1833, Deutsch)
Der Kuhbaum (Wien, 1834, Deutsch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (London, 1834, Englisch)
The cow-tree of South America (London, 1834, Englisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (Castlebar, 1834, Englisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (Durham, 1834, Englisch)
The cow-tree of South America (London, 1834, Englisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (Manchester, 1834, Englisch)
The Cow-Tree (London, 1834, Englisch)
Cow tree (Boston, Massachusetts, 1834, Englisch)
[Sur le Lait de l’arbre de la Vache et le Lait des végétaux en général] (New York City, New York, 1834, Englisch)
The Cow-Tree of South America (Merthyr Tydfil, 1835, Englisch)
Der Kuh- oder Milchbaum (München, 1838, Deutsch)
The cow tree (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1840, Englisch)
The Palo de Vacca (Belfast, 1841, Englisch)
The Cow Tree (Bolton, 1850, Englisch)
Arbol de leche (Mexico, 1852, Spanisch)
Milk, Bread, and Butter Trees! (Northampton, 1852, Englisch)
Milk, bread, and butter trees (Wells, 1852, Englisch)
Milk, bread, and butter trees (Cirencester, 1852, Englisch)
Milk, bread, and butter trees (Sligo, 1852, Englisch)
The Cow Tree (London, 1852, Englisch)
The palo de vaca or cow-tree (Enniskillen, 1853, Englisch)
The Cow Tree (Haverfordwest, 1853, Englisch)
The Cow Tree (Greensburg, Indiana, 1853, Englisch)
The cow tree (Loudon, Tennessee, 1854, Englisch)
Milk, bread and butter trees. (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1856, Englisch)
Milk and butter trees (London, 1856, Englisch)
The Cow Tree (Salisbury, North Carolina, 1857, Englisch)
|Seitenumbruch|

THE COW-TREE.

The following interesting account of this wonderof the vegetable world, is from the 4th volume of theTravels of M. de Humboldt:— ‘Amid the great number of curious phenomena which havepresented themselves to me in the course of my travels, I con-fess there are few that have so powerfully affected my imagina-tion as the aspect of the Cow-tree. Whatever relates to milk,whatever regards corn, inspires an interest, which is not merelythat of the physical knowledge of things, but it is connectedwith another order of ideas and sentiments. We can scarcelyconceive how the human race could exist without farinaceoussubstances, and without that nourishing juice which the breastof the mother contains, and which is appropriated to the longfeebleness of the infant. The amylaceous matter of corn, theobject of religious veneration among so many nations, ancientand modern, is diffused in the seeds and deposited in the rootsof vegetables; milk, which serves as an aliment, appears to usexclusively the produce of animal organization. Such are theimpressions we have received in our earliest infancy: such isalso the source of that astonishment which seizes us at the as-pect of the tree just described. It is not here the solemnshades of forests, the majestic course of rivers, the mountainswrapped in eternal frost, that excite our emotion. A few dropsof vegetable juice recal to our minds all the powerfulness andfecundity of nature. On the barren flank of rocks grows a treewith coriaceous and dry leaves. Its large woody roots canscarcely penetrate into the stone. For several months of theyear not a single shower moistens its foliage. Its branches ap-pear dead and dried; but when the trunk is pierced, there flowsfrom it a sweet and nourishing milk. It is at the rising of thesun that this vegetable fountain is most abundant. The blacksand natives are then seen hastening from all quarters, furnish-ed with large bowls to receive the milk, which grows yellow,and thickens at its surface. Some employ their bowls underthe tree itself, others carry the juice home to their children.—We seem to see the family of a shepherd, who distributes themilk of his flock. ‘I have described the sensations which the cow-treeawakens in the mind of the traveller at the first view. In ex-amining the physical properties of animal and vegetable pro-ducts, science displays them as closely linked together; butit strips them of what is marvellous, and perhaps, also, of apart of their charms, of what excited our astonishment. No-thing appears isolated; the chemical principles, that were be-lieved to be peculiar to animals, are found in plants; a com-mon chain links together all organic nature.’